Skip to content

Archive for

21
Aug

Gentle Yoga for seniors

Through my many years teaching and practicing yoga, I have realized the one thing that matters most in life is a positive attitude. I have worked with seniors and people with disabilities or injuries who have overcome physical challenges through the power of their will. That is why I am so passionate about sharing the power of yoga to help improve the quality of life for Seniors who may feel hopeless about their ability to ever experience the physical enjoyment of body movement again.

I am 82-years old and live in a senior community where I see and listen to many of my peers who are just feeling downright bad. Let’s admit it, the longer we live, the more aches and pains we are bound to have. I started yoga over 40 years ago after an old back injury started to flare up and the doctors told me I needed back surgery. I was determined to find a better way – a more natural and healing way, to ease my pain. I found that in Gentle Yoga, and have been practicing ever since.

Can Gentle Yoga really help You?
Now, can Gentle Yoga really help someone who has never done it before? Can it really ease pain, reverse the affects of aging, or simply get those atrophied muscles moving and feeling stronger? Yes, it can. No matter where you are today in your physical or mental condition, Gentle Yoga can help improve your state of mind and body. I have been teaching Gentle Yoga to seniors for decades, and have seen some amazing results.

Stay Independent longer with Gentle Yoga
At LeisureWorld, a senior’s community in Southern California, I taught yoga to 60, 70 and 80 year olds of all different physical and mental conditions. I remember fondly Jane, her family wanted to institutionalize her because they had given up hope. She was moping around, not caring for herself and just feeling miserable. But, she was adamant to stay as independent as she could so she started taking my Gentle Yoga classes. After 6 months of yoga, everyone commented on how good she looked, how nice her hair looked and you could see the confidence radiating out of her. Her whole outlook changed. I had the sons and daughters of the residents comment to me on how much their parents improved, their memories were coming back, and most importantly – their spirits were lifting.

What is Gentle Yoga Anyway?
For many of you, you may think yoga is some strange religion where you sit chanting and burning incense. But yoga is really a holistic approach to managing your physical, mental and spiritual health. Gentle Yoga is a series of stretching and strengthening movements that get your blood flowing and your joints and muscles moving. These movements improve your circulation, digestion and mental alacrity so that you just feel better. And when you feel better, you are more optimistic about life. You don’t have to be super flexible and fold your body into a pretzel. Gentle Yoga is not competitive, you progress at the pace your body takes you. And when you look back over weeks and months of doing yoga, I guarantee you will see an improvement and feel a sense of pride and accomplishment.

 
https://coolyogadotnet.wordpress.com/ebaypartnernetworkactivation.txt

20
Aug

The many other benefits of Yoga

Yoga, an age-old Indian practice, is associated with integrated physical, mental and spiritual awakening. In terms of modern interpretations, it generally refers to the asanas as forms of exercise and meditation. As an alternative medicine, Yoga has reached new heights of popularity in West and East alike. As of today, Yoga instructors all over the world are successfully guiding masses towards physical and mental improvement through the various low-impact physical exercises of Hatha Yoga, or the more strenuous Bikram Yoga or Power Yoga.

Musculoskeletal Benefits

All forms of yoga require the body to hold posture and balance, thereby strengthening muscles, joints, ligaments and tendons. People suffering from back and neck pain, stiffness in muscles have been benefited from the less demanding Hatha Yoga. Power Yoga, which keeps the body in constant movement, has been conclusively proven to increase athletic agility and core strength. Researchers are of the opinion that yoga actually increases bone density. This is a significant finding that can help millions of people suffering from osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Like all other fitness regimes, yoga helps in weight loss as well and not merely by burning calories during workouts. Yoga includes breathing exercises that increase lung capacity and metabolic processes, thus mobilizing fat stores faster. The various postures help reduce local fats that are otherwise difficult to eliminate.

Often, physicians prescribe Yoga to heal minor skeletal injuries and muscle sprains. Even minor skin burns are healed by Yoga which increases blood circulation in the injured area.

Cardiovascular Benefits

Many patients suffering from high blood pressure have opted for Yoga and found it beneficial. Hatha Yoga, especially, lowers heart rate and blood pressure by helping even circulation of blood throughout the body. Power Yoga is an effective form of cardio workout that increases strength of heart muscles. Yoga is one of the few types of exercises that help massaging all the internal organs and glands. This natural stimulus helps fighting diseases and keeping the body in sound order.

Yoga and Mental Health

Physical benefits aside, Yoga is a popular form of psychological therapy. The breathing exercises help people focus their energies and concentrate. Children suffering from attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity have been able to relax and concentrate after extensive yoga meditation routines. Generally, yoga practitioners are easily able to cope with anxiety, stress, depression and erratic mood swings. Many victims of trauma have turned to yoga to find inner peace and spiritual calm.

Other Benefits

Fatigue and insomnia are two major problems plaguing people all over the world; Yoga has been found beneficial to people suffering from either. Regular Yoga controls erratic sleep patterns, resulting in deeper sleep. In women, symptoms of menopause have been minimized by specific Yoga postures like the Mountain pose, the Warrior pose, the Triangle pose and the Standing Side Stretch pose. By increasing flexibility, Power Yoga helps minimize injury among athletes. Increased endurance and will power is another benefit of this practice. By stretching different visceral organs and the digestive tract, Yoga stimulates the body to flush out toxins.

Although there are countless benefits of Yoga, it is advised to consult a physician before starting the workout.

If you would like to book a boot camp, visit Sydney Boot Camps.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6476623

19
Aug

Yoga for the beginner

Have you thought of getting into yoga yet for some reason never make it to  your first class? Maybe your doctor has advised you to lose a bit or weight as  your weight is effecting your health. Perhaps you suffer from back ache and feel  yoga would help ease your pain. However, despite your good intentions, you never  quite make it to yoga. Something always crops up and another day goes by.

From experience of teaching and talking with new students, there are several  factors you need to consider which will make it easier for you to get into a  regular yoga routine.

Five Things To Consider Before Starting Yoga

If you are serious about getting into yoga here are five things you should  consider before signing up for lessons.

1. Chose a Class That Is Near Your Workplace Or Home

If you wish to take up yoga it is better to choose a class that is on your  way home from work or near your home. In the spur of the moment it is easy to  sign up for a class. However if you are tired and the weather is bad it is a  drag to go to a class which is out of your way or involves a long journey. All  to often I hear from students who have had a demanding day at work and once they  get home find it a struggle to get up and go out again.

Tip:

Chose a class which is on your way home from work. That way you reduce the  temptation of getting comfy at home and not wanting to go out again.  Alternatively, chose a class which is walking distance from your home. So, if  the weather is bad it is easier for you to walk to your class.

2. What Do I Wear? Do I Have to Buy Expensive Yoga  Clothes?

One of the most common questions new students ask is “what do I wear?”

All to often potential students feel they have to wear the latest designer  yoga clothing. This is expensive and the potential fear of this cost and the  thought they may not “fit in” if they do not have the “right clothing” deters  some students from starting yoga.

Tip:

Yoga is not about what you wear or who designs your outfit. Yoga is about  getting back to basics and honouring your body. I always recommend you wear  loose comfortable clothing. Not too baggy as this can get in the way when  stretching and not too tight or small as this can restrict movement. A  comfortable fitted track-suit, leggings, and cotton t-shirt is suitable. After a  few lessons,i f you feel you want to make yoga part of your daily schedule then  that is the time to invest in some good quality, breathable and stretchy yoga  pants and top.

3. What To Eat Before Your Class

Yoga is about moderation and balance. If you are new to yoga it is difficult  to judge how much to eat, what to eat and when to eat before your first class.  Eating a heavy meal before your class will leave you feeling lethargic, bloated  and low in energy. When you are a busy mum, it can be hard to fit in family meal  times as well as going to a class in time.

Tip:

Ideally, eat an easily digestible meal at least 60 minutes before your class.  Eat your meal in a quiet frame of mind, take your time to chew each morsel at  least 15 times. If time-pressed and have to cook family meals before leaving  out, try to cook a healthy snack or light meal for your family. Or even buy them  a take-away meal, if that makes it easier for you to arrive in time for your  class.

4. Negative Thoughts.

As a beginner it is easy to compare your self to others. You may feel you are  too old, too fat, stiff and flabby to do yoga. When you feel like this it is  easy to allow your negative thoughts to put you off going to classes.

Tip:

Regular yoga practice will encourage you to develop a positive, loving  relationship with your body. Whenever you find yourself feeling low and  downhearted about your body shape, take heart, breathe and congratulate yourself  for making positive moves to improve your health and well-being.

5. Push Yourself Beyond Your Comfort Limits

I often see beginner and even more experienced yogis fall into this trap. In  an effort to get into the “perfect pose” or keep up with others in the room, it  is tempting to push yourself beyond your current levels of fitness. This can  lead to strained and torn muscles and a sense that you are not “good  enough”-which is not yogic or healthy.

Tip:

Focus on your breath as you practice. You need to learn how to listen to your  body, and how to use your breath to guide you through your sequence. This will  help you to accept your current level of fitness and feel more at ease and  expansive in the poses.

Conclusion

In your desire to get into yoga, it is vital you observe the above  guidelines: make sure you do not strain yourself, waste money on buying  expensive new yoga clothes or eat a heavy meal before your class. Finally you  are more likely to maintain your practice if you chose a class which is easy for  you to travel to and slips easily into your everyday routine. Learning yoga is  the best gift you give to yourself. Be patient, take your time and listen to  your body as you practice. By following these suggestions you will find it  easier to get into yoga and form a solid foundation for continued  practice.

And now I invite you to find out more how yoga can help you reduce tension,  calm stressful thoughts and take care of worry, so you can relax and experience  calm and inner peace. Simply subscribe to my Free weekly Yoga Newsletter at http://yogainspires.co.uk/subscribe/ and as a Special Bonus  you will receive your FREE Yoga Cook Book – Delicious Veggie Food Made Easy when  you join today.
Wishing You Peace and Light
Ntathu Allen
Yoga  Teacher, Author and Meditation Guide

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5600249

19
Aug

Yoga-Nidra for sleep disorders

Many people, in our contemporary society, experience difficulty sleeping well on a consistent basis. In fact, it is estimated that fifty percent of adults, in the United States, struggle with insomnia. The types of insomnia range from difficulty falling asleep, to waking frequently during the night, and waking up too early. There are many different factors that can precipitate insomnia. An individual may experience insomnia because of a medical condition, such as sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, or periodic limb movement. Insomnia can also be caused by an inability to relax due to stress, anxiety, an overactive nervous system, and depression.

The practice of Yoga Nidra is an ancient Yogic technique that can help to address many of the underlying causes of insomnia. Practicing Nidra exercises will help to re-balance an overactive nervous system and soothe emotional anxiety. However, the practice of Yoga Nidra will not address all of the physical or medical causes of insomnia. If you think that your insomnia may be caused by a medical condition, it is recommended that you visit your doctor to pinpoint the exact cause and treatment of your sleeping problem. For example, if you are suffering from sleep apnea, you may need the support of a breathing apparatus at night.

Yoga Nidra techniques help to facilitate healing, by promoting a deep feeling of relaxation and well-being, which will help to restore emotional, mental, and physical health. The practice of Yoga Nidra techniques help to balance the two hemispheres of the brain, as well as the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems. Unresolved emotional issues are also addressed during a Yoga Nidra session, by bringing up images and feelings that are causing pain, confusion, and anxiety, while letting these feelings, images, and experiences go.

A nervous system, that is too keyed up, and the existence of unresolved emotional issues, are big contributors to insomnia. Yoga Nidra techniques will address these issues, and re-balance both the brain and the nervous system, through a series of exercises. A typical session usually begins with some gentle Yoga asanas and the setting of a sankalpa, or intention. This ancient set of techniques then leads the practitioner through a rotation of awareness of all areas of the body, progressive relaxation, an awareness of the breath, emotional integration, meditation, or dharana, with a re-statement of the original sankalpa. A great Nidra session will lead a Yoga practitioner toward a deep state of integration, relaxation, and connection, with the Divine.

© Copyright 2011 – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

Paul Jerard, E-RYT 500, has written many books on the subject of Yoga. He is a co-owner and the Director of Yoga Teacher Training at: Aura Wellness Center, in Attleboro, MA. He has been a certified Master Yoga Teacher since 1995. To receive Free Yoga videos, Podcasts, e-Books, reports, and articles about Yoga, please visit: http://www.yoga-teacher-training.org/

19
Aug

What can men expect from Yoga

Very often, men wonder what they can expect from Yoga. Within the United States, the practice of Yoga has traditionally been seen as a woman’s form of physical exercise. This view is diametrically-opposed to the traditional Indian view of the practice of Yoga. Going back to the early Indus Valley Civilization, the deep study of Yoga was primarily the domain of men. Regardless of the cultural context, or the time period, men can expect a regular practice of Yoga to enhance their health and well-being on a physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual level.

Physically, the regular practice of Yoga asanas (postures) will strengthen a man’s muscles and ligaments, as well as, improve his sense of balance. Yoga asanas will help to keep a man limber and flexible as he moves through the decades of his life. This flexibility will help to prevent injuries from muscles strains and torn ligaments. As a man ages, practicing balancing postures will also help to improve and hone his sense of balance, which is very important in preventing injuries, such as broken hips from falls. Additionally, with the regular practice of vigorous styles, such as Ashtanga, Power, Flow, or Vinyasa Yoga, a man’s cardiac health will be improved, and his blood pressure could be lowered.

The pranayama techniques (breathing exercises) of Yoga help to balance the brain, alleviate anxiety, and ease depression. The human need for pranayama is timeless. Our world moves at such a fast pace. The availability of all kinds of electronic technologies keeps us wired-in at all hours of the day and night. Many men and women are balancing a demanding career with personal family obligations. A brisk-paced schedule may have the effect of creating a frenetic mind and body. The breathing practices of Yoga help to restore balance to the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, allowing a man to slow down and rejuvenate his body and mind during a Yoga class.

On a spiritual level, gathering together with a group of like-minded, and often spiritually-oriented Yoga practitioners, will give a man the opportunity to connect with the energy within a Yoga class. In the practice of Yoga, the body and mind are connected through pranayama, asana, meditation, and relaxation techniques. The inward focus of a Yoga class, the gathering of other practitioners, and the atmosphere, within a typical session, will all help a man to be in touch with, and nourish his mind, body, and spirit. By choosing to practice Yoga regularly, in a class setting or in the privacy of his own home, a man will reap many benefits – ranging from improved physical health and well-being to emotional balance and spiritual growth.

© Copyright 2011 – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

Paul Jerard, E-RYT 500, has written many books on the subject of Yoga. He is a co-owner and the Director of Yoga Teacher Training at: Aura Wellness Center, in Attleboro, MA. He has been a certified Master Yoga Teacher since 1995. To receive Free Yoga videos, Podcasts, e-Books, reports, and articles about Yoga, please visit: http://www.yoga-teacher-training.org/

18
Aug

The different types of Yoga and what they do

Yoga is becoming a more and more popular activity in the Western world today. The number of places holding Yoga classes is on the increase and there is a plethora of different types of Yoga. With a choice of Hatha Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga, Power Yoga, Iyengar Yoga, Bikram Yoga, Vinyasa Yoga and many more it can be easy to get confused

The article will help you to understand the difference between the most popular types of Yoga so you can choose which type is right for you.

Hatha Yoga – in Sanskrit (an ancient classical language of India) “Ha” means “sun” and “tha” means “moon”. This type of Yoga is relatively slow paced, gentle type of Yoga and is a good place to start if you are completely new to Yoga and don’t know any of the asanas (poses). Like all types of Yoga, Hatha Yoga aims to unite the mind, body and spirit.

Ashtanga Yoga – this is the type of Yoga that I practice on a regular basis and means “eight limbs” in Sanskrit. It’s a fast moving, intense style of Yoga practice and is based on a progressive set sequence of asanas, synchronized with the breath. Ashtanga Yoga can be quite physically demanding as you constantly move from one asana in the sequence to the next, so you’ll find that it will improve your stamina as well as your flexibility and strength..

Power Yoga – this is a western interpretation of Yoga and is based on Ashtanga Yoga. A Power Yoga class may not necessarily stick to the exact sequence of poses like Ashtanga Yoga does, but it does involve practicing a series of poses without stopping and starting.

Iyengar Yoga – This type of Yoga is based on teachings by B.K.S Igengar and concentrates on the correct alignment and form of the body. Unlike Ashtanga Yoga, there is an emphasis on holding each pose for a long period of time rather than moving constantly from one pose to the next. Iyengar Yoga uses props such as blocks and straps to help align the body into the different poses.

Vinyasa Yoga – Vinyasa means breath synchronized movement and is another fast paced type of Yoga, with an emphasis on breathing. A practice typically starts with sun salutations and moves on to more intense stretching. Throughout the practice each pose is balanced with a counter pose.

Bikram Yoga – otherwise known as “Hot Yoga”, is practiced in a room heated to 105 degrees, with a humidity of around 40%. Generally a sequence of 26 different poses is practiced during a Bikram Yoga class and the hot temperature helps to loosen muscles. Due to the high temperature most people sweat a lot during the class and this helps to cleanse the body of toxins.

If you’re just starting out or have never done any Yoga before, I recommend trying a few different types of yoga to find out what you like best.

Remember, there’s no rule that says you have to stick to one type of Yoga. I like Ashtanga Yoga best, but I also go to occasional Iyengar and Hatha Yoga classes for a bit of variety.

To find out more about the different types of Yoga visit the Free online Yoga Guide

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Suzanne_

by Suzanne Morrison

Yoga is becoming a more and more popular activity in the Western world today. The number of places holding Yoga classes is on the increase and there is a plethora of different types of Yoga. With a choice of Hatha Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga, Power Yoga, Iyengar Yoga, Bikram Yoga, Vinyasa Yoga and many more it can be easy to get confused

The article will help you to understand the difference between the most popular types of Yoga so you can choose which type is right for you.

Hatha Yoga – in Sanskrit (an ancient classical language of India) “Ha” means “sun” and “tha” means “moon”. This type of Yoga is relatively slow paced, gentle type of Yoga and is a good place to start if you are completely new to Yoga and don’t know any of the asanas (poses). Like all types of Yoga, Hatha Yoga aims to unite the mind, body and spirit.

Ashtanga Yoga – this is the type of Yoga that I practice on a regular basis and means “eight limbs” in Sanskrit. It’s a fast moving, intense style of Yoga practice and is based on a progressive set sequence of asanas, synchronized with the breath. Ashtanga Yoga can be quite physically demanding as you constantly move from one asana in the sequence to the next, so you’ll find that it will improve your stamina as well as your flexibility and strength..

Power Yoga – this is a western interpretation of Yoga and is based on Ashtanga Yoga. A Power Yoga class may not necessarily stick to the exact sequence of poses like Ashtanga Yoga does, but it does involve practicing a series of poses without stopping and starting.

Iyengar Yoga – This type of Yoga is based on teachings by B.K.S Igengar and concentrates on the correct alignment and form of the body. Unlike Ashtanga Yoga, there is an emphasis on holding each pose for a long period of time rather than moving constantly from one pose to the next. Iyengar Yoga uses props such as blocks and straps to help align the body into the different poses.

Vinyasa Yoga – Vinyasa means breath synchronized movement and is another fast paced type of Yoga, with an emphasis on breathing. A practice typically starts with sun salutations and moves on to more intense stretching. Throughout the practice each pose is balanced with a counter pose.

Bikram Yoga – otherwise known as “Hot Yoga”, is practiced in a room heated to 105 degrees, with a humidity of around 40%. Generally a sequence of 26 different poses is practiced during a Bikram Yoga class and the hot temperature helps to loosen muscles. Due to the high temperature most people sweat a lot during the class and this helps to cleanse the body of toxins.

If you’re just starting out or have never done any Yoga before, I recommend trying a few different types of yoga to find out what you like best.

Remember, there’s no rule that says you have to stick to one type of Yoga. I like Ashtanga Yoga best, but I also go to occasional Iyengar and Hatha Yoga classes for a bit of variety.

To find out more about the different types of Yoga visit the Free online Yoga GuideProvided By: Health and Fitness

18
Aug

Understanding the term Yoga

The term yoga is a common word in the Sanskrit language, which is the language in which most of the Yoga scriptures are written.  It also happens to be one of the most versatile Sanskrit terms, having a whole range of meanings that extend from simple “union” to “team,” “constellation,” and “conjunction.”  It is derived from the verbal root yuj, meaning “to harness, yoke, prepare, equip, and fasten.”

The male practitioner of Yoga is referred to as a yogin or yogi and the female practitioner as a yogini.  Common synonyms are yoga-vid meaning “knower of Yoga” and yukta meaning “yoked one”.   Sometimes the word yoga-yuj, meaning “one who is yoked in Yoga” is used.  A master of Yoga may be referred to as a yoga raj (“king of Yoga”) or yogendra (from yoga and indra, meaning “lord”).

In addition to yoga and yukta, the verbal root yuj also yields the old Sanskrit word yuga, denoting “yoke,” which is the literal yoke placed on an ox and the yoke or burden of the years.  It is probably in the latter, metaphoric sense that yuga is applied to the four great world cycles, which according to Hinduism, continuously revolve, thus creating history.  At present we are believed to be in the final world age, the kali-yuga, in which spirituality and morality are at their lowest ebb.  The kali-yuga is the Dark Age, which is destined to terminate in a convulsive cataclysm, accompanied by a major purging of humanity.  Thereafter a new Golden Age will begin, starting the four-phase cycle all over again.

The term yoga is closely related to a number of words in various Indo-European languages, including the English yoke, the German Joch, and the Latin iugum, which all have the same meaning.  In a spiritual context, the word yoga can have two primary meanings.  It can stand for either “union” or “discipline.”  In most cases, both connotations are present when the term yoga is applied.  Therefore, dhyana-yoga is the unitive discipline of meditation; samnyasa-yoga is the
unitive discipline of renunciation; karma-yoga is the unitive discipline of self-transcending action; kriya-yoga is the unitive discipline of ritual; bhakti-yoga is the unitive discipline of love and devotion to the Divine, and so on.

What does the term unitive mean?   It describes Yoga’s disciplined approach to simplifying one’s consciousness and energy to the level where we no longer experience any inner conflict and are able to live in harmony with the universe.  In addition, unitive specifically refers to the goal of many branches and schools of Yoga, which is to realize our essential nature, the Self (atman, purusha), by consciously uniting with it.  This understanding of Yoga is characteristic of those teachings that subscribe to a nondualist metaphysics according to which the Self is the ultimate singular Reality underlying all events.

Click Here!

18
Aug

How Can I Benefit from Yoga classes?

Exercise of any kind boosts health and improves performance. Read on to learn how you can benefit from yoga classes. You don’t need to be strong to begin practice. By regularly attending classes, you will notice positive changes in your health. The various sessions would provide training in various postures (asanas), proper breathing, relaxation, and meditation. All you need to get started are a yoga mat, and suitable clothing that gives you room for movement while also enabling the teacher to see that you are doing the poses correctly.

Advantages of Yoga Classes

Improved Flexibility – If you have tight, short, or stiff muscles, the sessions are a great way to elongate and loosen them. Tight muscles frequently move the body out of correct alignment. Attending yoga sessions will help to fix that problem. Even if you haven’t worked on a specific body part in the course of a session, you’ll notice that that part has also become supple. The body naturally becomes lithe as a consequence of performing varied asanas together, one after the other.

Improved Strength – The various physical sequences help in the building of muscle, endurance, and strength.

Improved Blood Circulation and More Energy – There are various postures and poses that help to regulate blood flow. Improved blood flow helps in proper removal of waste and toxins, regular cleaning of the body’s vital organs, and improved body efficiency and immunity. It also makes the person feel energetic rather than lethargic or tired.

Reduced Stress – There is hormone regulation and release of muscular tension. This facilitates an improved sense of well-being. The classes would help you to focus and concentrate better. In this way, you will be able to clear your mind of negative thoughts. As relaxation is an essential part of the sessions, this too would help to control stress.

Gets Rid of Excess Fat – Asanas that focus on specific parts of the body get rid of fat in areas such as the hips, abdomen, and waist. They help to increase metabolism and tone the body.

Better Body-Mind Awareness – The different asanas facilitate better awareness of the body, mind, breath, and environment.

Undergoing Professional Training is better than Learning by Yourself

Moving away from the health benefits, there are other benefits to be gained from attending yoga training sessions. Attending professional training sessions would be more helpful than practicing with a video or by yourself. It would enable you to deepen your practice and to make progress faster. A yoga teacher would make adjustments that would assist in getting into the right positions for the poses.

Secondly, the sessions give you an opportunity to meet and interact with others who have interests similar to your own. When you are with like-minded people, the sessions are all the more fun and you feel egged on to continue practicing.

Thus, you can benefit a lot from yoga classes in terms of good mental and physical well-being.

Yoga Classes Long Island – Yoga teachers at YICG in Long Island, NYC guide you to better health and spirituality.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Alicia_Blaze

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6492059

18
Aug

Yoga and Breast Cancer

Any claim regarding Yoga and specific ailments is subject to medical and scientific scrutiny. It is not enough to know that therapeutic Yoga works. Most of the motivation behind scientific research concerns why therapeutic Yoga works. Once again, the benefits of Yoga regarding cancer recovery are being carefully researched, but this time two research groups from east and west are working together.

According to University of Texas MD Anderson Center’s new study about breast cancer and Yoga, the practice of this ancient healing art not only increases the quality of life for breast cancer survivors, but it also helps to balance hormones and fight fatigue in women undergoing radiation treatments. In findings to be presented to the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in June 2011, researchers will attempt to establish the validity of claims that alternative and complementary medicine can benefit the health of cancer patients.

The clinical studies at MD Anderson – in conjunction with the help of Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana (VYASA), a therapeutic Yoga research foundation and university in Bangalore, India, and a well-known organization in India – used a combination of asanas, breathing techniques, meditation, and other methods of relaxation to create a therapy regimen.

Results included better physical health, improved functioning, and a greater acceptance of the experiences with breast cancer. The program also helped patients gradually transition from close medical supervision to more independent lives. While practicing Yoga obviously makes breast cancer patients feels better, another study showed that results can last as long as 12 weeks after the exercise program ends.

There are several ways that Yoga benefits breast cancer patients:

• Allows the body to relax (different from sleep)

• Calms parasympathetic nervous system

• Drains stagnant lymphatic fluid

• Regulates glands and releases “good” hormones

• Decreases depression by as much as 50%, based on clinical studies

• Massages organs so that they work more effectively

• Aids in reduction of hot flashes

• Teaches control of the breath, reducing pain, and oxygenating blood

• Reduces fatigue and joint pain

• Improves quality of sleep

• Promotes meditation and visualization techniques

Although Restorative Yoga – a gentle Yoga that relaxes the entire body – is frequently chosen, many Hatha styles can be therapeutically modified to help women during or after treatment. In 2010, researchers at Rochester University Medical Center tested the results of specific types of Yoga techniques for breast cancer. These included gentle poses in sitting, standing, reclining, and transitional positions, as well as meditation and visualization. While these are effective, doctors advise against rigorous exercises or Yoga done in heated rooms.

© Copyright 2011 – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

Paul Jerard, E-RYT 500, has written many books on the subject of Yoga. He is a co-owner and the Director of Yoga Teacher Training at: Aura Wellness Center, in Attleboro, MA. He has been a certified Master Yoga Teacher since 1995. To receive Free Yoga videos, Podcasts, e-Books, reports, and articles about Yoga, please visit: http://www.yoga-teacher-training.org/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Paul_Jerard

18
Aug

Yoga and your Blood Pressure

To function properly, the human body must maintain sufficient blood pressure, to allow blood to be pushed to all extremities and flow throughout the body. However, when the blood pressure is very high, it is known as hypertension. The heart must work hard, and strain, to pump the blood volume. Hypertensive patients are at high risk for organ damage, including damage to the retina, brain, heart, and kidneys.

Yoga is shown to lower pressure of the blood within the circulatory system, and those who regularly practice a Yogic lifestyle, usually enjoy lower rates of hypertension than the general population. Practicing Yoga, to control hypertension, has been proven effective – without the side effects experienced with medication. However, proper instruction with a competent Yoga teacher and a medical professional are strongly advised.

 

  • Note: Anyone with hypertension should discuss their treatment with a physician, including any Yoga practice they intend to pursue.

 

B. K. S. Iyengar, one of the world’s foremost experts on Yoga and a teacher for 75 years, offers a number of suggestions regarding the practice of Yoga to reduce hypertension. B. K. S. Iyengar’s book, “Light on Yoga,” details the asanas, which regulate the pressure of the blood within the circulatory system. Forward bends, supine positions, sitting positions, and inversions all help blood pressure, with forward bends being the fundamental asanas recommended.

 

  • Note: The above mentioned inversions are recommended for the purpose of “regulating” blood pressure – but may not be advised for those individuals who have high blood pressure.

 

B. K. S. Iyengar recommends the following Yoga poses (asanas), in particular, for the management of high blood pressure: Savasana (resting pose), Virasana (hero pose), Uttanasana (standing forward bend), Janu Sirsasana (head to knee pose), Setu Bandha Sarvangasana (bridge pose), Adho Mukha Svanasana (downward facing dog), and Baddha Konasana (cobbler or bound ankle pose).

These poses relieve stress and relax the sympathetic nervous system, allowing blood pressure to drop. There are also several asanas that should be avoided by people with high blood pressure. Vrksasana (tree pose) should be practiced, without the arms raised overhead.

Utthita Trikonasana (extended triangle pose) should be modified, by turning the head to gaze downward, leaving the hand at the waist instead of raising it upward. Virabhadrasana 2 and 3 (warrior two and three), Adho Mukha Vrksasana (full arm balance) and Sirsasana (headstand) should not be practiced at all by those with hypertension.

The definitive study on Yoga and high blood pressure is considered to be Chandra Patel and W.R.S. North’s research – published in the journal, “The Lancet” in 1975 – in which 34 hypertensive patients participated. They were assigned to either to Yoga relaxation methods with bio-feedback, or given a placebo therapy (general relaxation) for six weeks.

As a fully randomized study, the results were highly significant, with blood pressure in the Yoga group falling from 168/100 to 141/84 mm. (Normal blood pressure is generally considered to be 120/80 mm.) There is every reason, for those with hypertension, to explore Yoga as a complementary treatment.

© Copyright 2011 – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

Paul Jerard, E-RYT 500, has written many books on the subject of Yoga. He is a co-owner and the Director of Yoga Teacher Training at: Aura Wellness Center, in Attleboro, MA. He has been a certified Master Yoga Teacher since 1995. To receive Free Yoga videos, Podcasts, e-Books, reports, and articles about Yoga, please visit: http://www.yoga-teacher-training.org/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Paul_Jerard

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6345274